January Festivals and Events

Credit to junsabayton of Flickr

Credit to junsabayton of Flickr

Feast of the Black Nazarene

Date: January 9th Location: Quiapo, Manila

A grand Fiesta, this festival centers on the image of the Black Nazarene which was transported by galleon from Mexico to Manila in the 17th century. The festival is marked by an afternoon procession by thousands of devotees.

Credit to shemlongakit of Flickr

Credit to shemlongakit of Flickr

Ati-Atihan

Date: January 16-22 Location: Kalibo, Aklan

One of the most popular of the Philippine festivals, the Ati-atihan is a celebration in honor of the Sto. Niño. Revelers don colorful costumes and paint their bodies black and dance to the distictive beat of “Hala bira!” around the town.

Credit to San Joaquin, Iloilo, Panay, Philippines of Flickr

Credit to San Joaquin, Iloilo, Panay, Philippines of Flickr

Pasungay

Date: Every 2nd Saturday of January Location: San Joaquin, Iloilo

A festival of bulls on the hillsides of San Joaquin. Prized bulls from the town and neighboring areas fight amidst wild cheering from spectators.

Credit to akosikenet of Flickr

Credit to akosikenet of Flickr

Sinulog Festival

Date: Every third weekend of January Location: Cebu City, Cebu

The Feast of the Sto. Niño is celebrated in Cebu with a procession, street dancing competition and a fluvial parade. Much like the Ati-atihan, the Sinulog Festival is marked by frenzied reverly to the chant of “Pit Senor!”

Credit to ako may camera of Flickr

Credit to ako may camera of Flickr

Dinagyang

Date: Every fourth weekend of January Location: Iloilo City, Iloilo

Spectacle characterized by a frenetic stomping of feet and hypnotic drumbeating. It is a colorful whirl of thousands of people dressed in unique costumes dancing and chanting all day and night.

Credit to blackhawk1552

Credit to blackhawk1552

Zambulawan

Date: Every third Sunday of January Location: Pagadian City, Zamboanga del Sur

The founding of Pagadian City showcases the Subanon tribe’s rich cultural heritage by way of songs, dances and exhibits of musical instruments.

Please let me know if I missed anything.

facebooktwittergooglelinkedinpinterestemail

ILOILO

ILOILO, the largest province in Panay Island of the Western Visayas Region, is divided into 42 municipalities & 1 component city, composed of 1,721 brgys. with Iloilo City as the provincial capital.  Iloilo takes its name from Irong-Irong, the old name of the city of Iloilo, a tongue of land that sitcks out like a nose on the south side of the Iloilo River.

This mystical province, poised for progress, is famous for its delightful contrast between the east & west, the old and new … of tall buildings and nipa hus, of modern streamers and scurrying native boats, of free-wheeling cars and jeepneys.

A heritage and adventure destination in this side of the region, Iloilo prides itself with having the country’s oldest and well-preserved churches, ancestral homes, & other historical landmarks, resplendent festivals, unspoiled coastal communities with pristine beaches and islands.

Iloilo is harnessing the potentials of its strategic location, abundant resources & established facilities to attain revitalized growth.  Centrally located, it serves as the gateway to Southern Philippines and holds an unparalleled advantage of being the hub of trade, commerce and industry.

Agriculture is the principal industry of Iloilo.  Its production of rice, sugar, mongo, fish and other major producs has placed the province among the country’s top agricultural prodcuers.

While Iloilo teems with energy and vibrancy of new developments, the glory of its heritage is stiill evident in its architecture and lives on in the hearts of its people.  Truly, Iloilo is a destination that fulfill your needs, a place for history, business, leisure and one that you could proudly call home.

How To Get Here

Travel by Air: From Manila to Iloilo that takes about an hour. From Cebu to Iloilo its only 35 minutes by plane and 2 hours from Davao and Cotabato.

You can try by Sea: From Manila to Iloilo, sailing time is about 20 hours.From Zamboanga or Cagayan de Oro to Iloilo,about 14 hours and from Cebu to Iloilo, 12 hours. Lastly, Fastcrafts from Bacolod City to Iloilo take 50 minutes.
Another Economical way to travel is nautical highway service by roll-on-roll-off (RORO) vessels fom various parts of the country. Bus terminals are in Ali Mall Cubao, Quezon City and Pasay City.

facebooktwittergooglelinkedinpinterestemail

Dinagyang

What is Dinagyang?

The Dinagyang is a religious and cultural festival in Iloilo City, Philippines held on the fourth Sunday of January, or right after the Sinulog in Cebu and the Ati-Atihan in Aklan. It is held both to honor the Santo Niño and to celebrate the arrival on Panay of Malay settlers and the subsequent selling of the island to them by the Atis.

Dinagyang began after Rev. Fr. Ambrosio Galindez of a local Roman Catholic parish introduced the devotion to Santo Niño in November 1967. In 1968, a replica of the original image of the Santo Niño de Cebu was brought to Iloilo by Fr. Sulpicio Enderez as a gift to the Parish of San Jose. The faithful, led by members of Confradia del Santo Niño de Cebu, Iloilo Chapter, worked to give the image a fitting reception starting at the Iloilo Airport and parading down the streets of Iloilo.

In the beginning, the observance of the feast was confined to the parish. The Confradia patterned the celebration on the Ati-atihan of Ibajay, Aklan, where natives dance in the streets, their bodies covered with soot and ashes, to simulate the Atis dancing to celebrate the sale of Panay. It was these tribal groups who were the prototype of the present festival.

In 1977, the Marcos government ordered the various regions of the Philippines to come up with festivals or celebrations that could boost tourism and development. The City of Iloilo readily identified the Iloilo Ati-atihan as its project. At the same time the local parish could no longer handle the growing challenges of the festival.

The Dinagyang is divided into three Major events: Ati-Ati Street Dancing, Kasadyahan Street Dancing and Miss Dinagyang.

Today, the main part of the festival consists of a number of “tribes”, called “tribus”, who are supposed to be Ati tribe members dancing in celebration. There are a number of requirements, including that the performers must paint their skin brown and that only indigenous materials can be used for the costumes. All dances are performed to drum music. Many tribes are organized by the local high schools. Some tribes receive a subsidiary from the organizers and recruit private sponsors, with the best tribes receiving the most. The current Ati population of Iloilo is not involved with any of the tribes nor are they involved in the festival in any other way.

Dinagyang was voted as the best Tourism Event for 2006,2007 and 2008 by the Association of Tourism Officers in the Philippines.

The first festival in the world to get the support of the United Nations for the promotion of the Millennium Development Goals.

Cited by the Asian Development Bank as Best Practice on government, private sector & NGO cooperation. (from Wikipedia).

From Dinagyang 2008

From Dinagyang 2008

From Dinagyang 2008

From Dinagyang 2008

From Dinagyang 2008

From Dinagyang 2008

From Dinagyang 2008

From Dinagyang 2008

From Dinagyang 2008

From Dinagyang 2008

From Dinagyang 2008

From Dinagyang 2008

From Dinagyang 2008

From Dinagyang 2008

From Dinagyang 2008

From Dinagyang 2008

From Dinagyang 2008

From Dinagyang 2008

From Dinagyang 2008

From Dinagyang 2008

From Dinagyang 2008

From Dinagyang 2008

From Dinagyang 2008

From Dinagyang 2008

From Dinagyang 2008

From Dinagyang 2008

From Dinagyang 2008

From Dinagyang 2008

From Dinagyang 2008

From Dinagyang 2008

I really wanted to use my own Dinagyang pictures but my face was all over it so I decided to use pictures from my lovely college professor Ces Maria Amular and you can avail her services by visiting Amular Photography

facebooktwittergooglelinkedinpinterestemail
   

Photos

IMG_5160.JPGIMG_5214.JPG
IMG_4190.JPGIMG_4983.JPG
IMG_5278.JPG





www.flickr.com

Recent Posts

Tags

Recent Comments